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Active and Passive Verb Forms

education gateway active and passive verb forms

Active and Passive Verb Forms

In this article we will learn you some more about Active and Passive Verb Forms. Sentences can be active or passive. Therefore, tenses also have “active forms” and “passive forms.” You must learn to recognise the difference to successfully speak English.

Read the following sentences:

He is writing a letter. (Active)

A letter is being written by him. (Passive)

You will have noticed that the verb changes its form when the sentence is changed from the active voice to the passive voice. The passive form of the verb is constructed by putting appropriate auxiliary verbs before the past participle form of the active verb.

 

The Theory of Active and Passive Verb Forms

Active Form

In active sentences, the thing doing the action is the subject of the sentence and the thing receiving the action is the object. Most sentences are active. Active and Passive Verb Forms.

 

Passive Form

In passive sentences, the thing receiving the action is the subject of the sentence and the thing doing the action is optionally included near the end of the sentence. You can use the passive form if you think that the thing receiving the action is more important or should be emphasised. You can also use the passive form if you do not know who is doing the action or if you do not want to mention who is doing the action.

 

Here is some theory about the Active Form:

[Thing doing action] + [verb] + [thing receiving action]

Active and Passive verb forms

And here is some theory about the Passive Form:

[Thing receiving action] + [be] + [past participle of verb] + [by] + [thing doing action]

Active and Passive Verb Forms.

The Present Continuous Tense

When the active verb is in the present continuous tense 

Active verb: is/am/are writing

He is writing a letter.

Passive verb: is/am/are being written

A letter is being written by him.

The Present Perfect Tense

When the active verb is in the present perfect tense

Active verb: has/have written

He has written a letter.

Passive verb: has/have been written

A letter has been written by him.

The Simple Past Tense

When the active verb is in the simple past tense

Active verb: wrote

He wrote a letter.

Passive verb: was/were written

A letter was written by him.

The Past Continuous Tense

When the active verb is in the past continuous tense

Active verb: was/were writing

He was writing a letter.

Passive verb: was/were being written

A letter was being written by him.

The Past Perfect Tense

When the active verb is in the past perfect tense

Active verb: had written

He had written a letter.

Passive verb: had been written

A letter had been written by him.

The Simple Future Tense

When the active verb is in the simple future tense

Active verb: will/shall write

He will write a letter.

Passive verb: will/shall be written

A letter will be written by him.

The Future Perfect Tense 

When the active verb is in the future perfect tense 

Active verb: will/shall have written

He will have written a letter.

Passive verb: will/shall have been written

A letter will have been written by him.

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English Slang and Idioms – Part I

English Slang and Idioms

English Slang and Idioms – Part I

English Slang and IdiomsI have a confession – sometimes I change the way I speak when I am in different environments.  Now, this isn’t such a terrible thing if the environment is my English Language classroom; it makes listening and understanding easier for elementary ESL students if I choose simpler words and speak slower than normal.  However, when I don’t want someone to understand me (maybe because I’m playing some sort of game), then I will say something like this:

Deez peeps ain’t followin’ nuttin’ I’s spittin’.

Roughly, I might translate this as:

These people do not understand anything I am saying.

English slang is something that varies from place to place – some English speakers might even find it impossible to understand one another with such huge differences in Conversational English.  In order to help you navigate these difficult waters, here is a list of some common slangs and idioms from American English:

Verbs English Slang and Idioms – Part I

English Word Meaning
(get a) kick out of enjoy
barf, puke vomit
bash crush, beat
blow spend, waste
break it up stop
call predict
con deceive
cool down calm down
crack open open, start
cram study a lot
cruise go fast
ditch leave
eat(ing away) bother, erode
get into something become seriously interested in
get with it hurry up
go(ing) down happen(ing)
hang up quit
have a big mouth talk too much
hustle hurry up
keep one’s cool remain calm
knock up to make pregnant
mellow out calm down, relax
pig out eat a lot
rules dominates
run out of gas lose interest, momentum
screw around waste time
spook scare
take a hike leave

English Slang and Idioms.

Adjectives English Slang and Idioms – Part I

English Word Meaning
(he is) history gone, finished
awesome great
beat tired
blown away totally amazed
bummed sad
cool good
dead boring, quiet
dicey unsure, not definite
dirty obscene
foxy sexy
goofy silly
groovy fun, nice
gross disgusting
grungy dirty
hairy dangerous
high intoxicated (drugs)
hot stolen
in fashionable
laid-back calm, relaxed
lame pathetic, inadequate
neat good, interesting
no sweat no problem
nuts crazy
pooped (out) very tired
straight (answer) honest
stressed anxious
totaled wrecked
up awake
wired alert

English Slang and Idioms.

Nouns English Slang and Idioms – Part I

(it was a) hit successful
a riot very funny
ace very good
action excitement
all-nighter when you stay up all night
ammo ammunition
big stink big issue
booze alcohol
break opportunity
buck money
chow food
cop police officer
damage cost
dork stupid or boring person
dough money
fix dose of drugs (addict)
flashback memory
flick movie
gig performance, job
glitch defect, error
gut stomach
guts courage
hype excitement
I.D. identification (card)
meltdown total collapse
pain in the neck annoying
piece of cake easy
pit stop quick stop
pro professional
psycho crazy person
shot try

English Slang and Idioms.

English Slang and Idioms – Part I